Angoon Airport EIS Resources “Tiny but mighty”: The tiny, but mighty, Alaskan mosquitoes

“Tiny but mighty”: The tiny, but mighty, Alaskan mosquitoes

Posted October 11, 2021 12:37:46A tiny, yet mighty mosquito that can cause serious illness, blindness and death is to be featured in a new book by the author, a biologist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

The Alaskans, who are renowned for their “unflinching” resilience and “totally resilient” behaviour, will be featured on the cover of the book “Alaskans on the Edge”, due out in November, which was recently published in an edited version by the Australian publisher Algonquin Books.

The book was written by Alaskas biologist and award-winning writer Chris Janson, who spent three years as an Alaskian research assistant at the university, in addition to two years as a research assistant for the state of Alaska.

“I’m really excited to write this book, I’ve had an opportunity to work with a lot of people over the years,” he said.

“Alaskas mosquitoes have a reputation as having a big bite, but there are actually about a million of them, and they’re very small.”

We had a few years ago, a mosquito bite in a house in the centre of Fairbanks killed 10 people, and there were two dozen other people who were also bitten.

“In the years that I’ve been in Fairbanks, I know that the people that live there are absolutely determined to be on top of things.”

They’ve done an excellent job of keeping people safe, but unfortunately there are some who are out to get us.

“The Algos are not the only mosquitoes that thrive in Alaska, with some species of black widow also known to live in the state.

But unlike the Algies, the Black Widows have adapted to living in close quarters and have evolved a keen sense of smell to find mates, the scientists say.”

Alaskan scientists say the mosquito’s adaptation has helped to keep populations at bay, with scientists saying the mosquito population has risen by more than 10 per cent in the last five years.””

They have been able to find people and mate with them, so they are a very important species in the Alaskayan ecosystem.”

Alaskan scientists say the mosquito’s adaptation has helped to keep populations at bay, with scientists saying the mosquito population has risen by more than 10 per cent in the last five years.

“The mosquitoes that live in Alaska are actually very resilient, they are resilient to cold, and to heat,” Dr Chris Jenson said.

“We’ve had this huge population of Algosaurs in Alaska that were wiped out by the Algonquins, and the mosquitoes have adapted quite well to live with them.”

The book will feature in an anthology by Algonkin, the publishing company behind the Algo Book and other books including “A Bizarre Tale of the Alkan Tribe”.

“The Algonkins have been the true pioneers in Alaska,” Dr Dennison said.